Tag: language

Some fairy tales may be 6,000 years old

It’s fascinating to think that children’s stories may have been told and re-told across languages and cultures for millennia. It just goes to show the power of narrative structure!

Fairy tales are transmitted through language, and the shoots and branches of the Indo-European language tree are well-defined, so the scientists could trace a tale’s history back up the tree—and thus back in time. If both Slavic languages and Celtic languages had a version of Jack and the Beanstalk (and the analysis revealed they might), for example, chances are the story can be traced back to the “last common ancestor.” That would be the Proto-Western-Indo-Europeans from whom both lineages split at least 6800 years ago. The approach mirrors how an evolutionary biologist might conclude that two species came from a common ancestor if their genes both contain the same mutation not found in other modern animals.

[…]

Tehrani says that the successful fairy tales may persist because they’re “minimally counterintuitive narratives.” That means they all contain some cognitively dissonant elements—like fantastic creatures or magic—but are mostly easy to comprehend. Beauty and the Beast, for example, contains a man who has been magically transformed into a hideous creature, but it also tells a simple story about family, romance, and not judging people based on appearance. The fantasy makes these tales stand out, but the ordinary elements make them easy to understand and remember. This combination of strange, but not too strange, Tehrani says, may be the key to their persistence across millennia.

Source: Some fairy tales may be 6000 years old | AAAS

Does Not Translate 

I enjoyed some of these untranslatable words from languages other than English.

Sturmfrei (German) When all the people you live with are gone for a while and you have the whole place to yourself.

Gyakugire (Japanese) Getting mad at somebody because they got mad at you for something you did.

Bear favour (Swedish) To do something for someone with good intentions, but it actually has negative consequences instead.

Source: Does Not Translate – Words that don’t translate to other languages

Friday fancies

These are some things I came across this week that made me smile:

  • The fake French minister in a silicone mask who stole millions (BBC News) — “For two years from late 2015, an individual or individuals impersonating France’s defence minister, Jean-Yves Le Drian, scammed an estimated €80m (£70m; $90m) from wealthy victims including the Aga Khan and the owner of Château Margaux wines.”
  • No, You Don’t Really Look Like That (The Atlantic) — “The global economy is wired up to your face. And it is willing to move heaven and Earth to let you see what you want to see.”
  • Can You Unwrinkle A Raisin? (FiveThirtyEight) — “Back when you couldn’t just go buy a bottle of wine, folks would, instead, buy a giant brick of raisins, soak them in water to rehydrate the dried-out fruit and then store that juice in a dark cupboard for 60 days.”
  • What Ecstasy Does to Octopuses (The Atlantic) — “At first they used too high a dose, and the animals “freaked out and did all these color changes”… But once the team found a more suitable dose, the animals behaved more calmly—and more sociably.”
  • The English Word That Hasn’t Changed in Sound or Meaning in 8,000 Years (Nautilus) — “The word lox was one of the clues that eventually led linguists to discover who the Proto-Indo-Europeans were, and where they lived. “

Image via webcomic.name