Tag: edtech (page 1 of 5)

Chromebooks banned in Danish schools

Slowly, and then all at once is how a ‘splinternet’ happens. I’m seeing more and more cases of the EU standing up to so-called Big Tech companies like Google over data processing agreements.

In this case, it’s Denmark’s data protection agency, but I should imagine other European countries might follow suit. There’ll be an uproar, though, because data security and sovereignty aside, Google absolutely nailed it with that operating system.

Denmark is effectively banning Google’s services in schools, after officials in the municipality of Helsingør were last year ordered to carry out a risk assessment around the processing of personal data by Google.

In a verdict published last week, Denmark’s data protection agency, Datatilsynet, revealed that data processing involving students using Google’s cloud-based Workspace software suite — which includes Gmail, Google Docs, Calendar and Google Drive — “does not meet the requirements” of the European Union’s GDPR data privacy regulations.

Specifically, the authority found that the data processor agreement — or Google’s terms and conditions — seemingly allow for data to be transferred to other countries for the purpose of providing support, even though the data is ordinarily stored in one of Google’s EU data centers.

Source: Denmark bans Chromebooks and Google Workspace in schools over data transfer risks | TechCrunch

Recalling generative and liberating uses of technology

I found myself using the phrase “the night is darkest before dawn” today. This post from Anne-Marie Scott is certainly an example of that, and I too look forward to a world beyond “today’s dogpile of an internet”.

I remember a time when I got excited about generative and liberating uses of technology, enabling people to bring their whole selves to learning, being able to incorporate their world, their context, their knowledge, and in turn develop new connections, new communities, and new knowledge to further explore and build on these things. I think this is still possible, and I think work around open practices, open pedagogies, ethics of care, and decolonisation point the way towards how to do it in today’s dogpile of an internet.

Source: Hitting the wall and maybe working out how to get back up again | A placid island of ignorance…

Audrey Watters says goodbye to EdTech

Sadly, EdTech, the field that I used to feel part of, is never going to change, so this post from Audrey Watters was sadly inevitable. Anything that can be commodified will be commodified, it would seem.

Thanks Audrey, you’re awesome. I hope you find solace and energy in what you decide to do next.

I probably do have a wee bit more to say about ed-tech — the “good riddance” part — but I don’t feel like posting it on Hack Education. I’ll write about it here — therapeutically, I reckon. But I don’t really want to continue to churn out criticism of the field/industry/discipline. Sufficed to say: folks will bend over backwards to justify the most fucked-up tools and the most oppressive educational practices and technologies. Some folks will say yes, the technology is bad — if we just had better technology then everything’d be okay. Others will say that it’s our educational practices that suck — if we just had better pedagogies, then everything technological would fall into place. Both camps still insist that the future is “digital,” and as such, are trapped in a story that will never get them to “better” because the foundations will always be rotten. And so few people in ed-tech, so fixated on their fantasies about the future, want to talk about that.

Source: Goodbye Ed-tech, and Good Riddance | Audrey Watters