Category: Links (page 1 of 110)

Recalling generative and liberating uses of technology

I found myself using the phrase “the night is darkest before dawn” today. This post from Anne-Marie Scott is certainly an example of that, and I too look forward to a world beyond “today’s dogpile of an internet”.

I remember a time when I got excited about generative and liberating uses of technology, enabling people to bring their whole selves to learning, being able to incorporate their world, their context, their knowledge, and in turn develop new connections, new communities, and new knowledge to further explore and build on these things. I think this is still possible, and I think work around open practices, open pedagogies, ethics of care, and decolonisation point the way towards how to do it in today’s dogpile of an internet.

Source: Hitting the wall and maybe working out how to get back up again | A placid island of ignorance…

The corrosive nature of captalism

I used to think there was no chance of the current system of capital-based society ending within my lifetime.

But now? I’m not so sure. I see influential writers I respect like Seth Godin and (in this case) Warren Ellis talk openly about the harms of capitalism.

And given the crypto collapse following the pandemic perhaps people are slowly coming to realise there’s more to life than money…

money

From a certain perspective, capitalism is the environment into which we are born, and conditions within it are corrosive: we either adapt to those conditions in order to survive — people will always have to be taught how to tend the machines, and it has been said, after all, that humans are the reproductive organs of machines — or build a sturdy environment suit, or we are seriously harmed. Which casts many of us as good little prisoners or effective wasteland scavengers.

Source: A Suit Of Capitalism | WARREN ELLIS LTD

Image: Jorge Salvador

Frozen baby woolly mammoth discovered in Yukon gold fields

Amazing. Look at how perfectly this creature was preserved in the permafrost!

I guess we’ll be seeing a lot more of this kind of thing as the permafrosts melt due to the climate crisis.

The baby woolly mammoth, named Nun cho ga, which means “big baby animal” in the Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin’s Hän language, is about 140 cm long, which is a little bit longer than the other baby woolly mammoth that was found in Siberia, Russia, in May 2007.

Zazula thinks Nun cho ga was probably about 30 to 35 days old when she died. Based on the geology of the site, Zazula believes she died between 35,000 and 40,000 years ago.

“So she died during the last ice age and found in permafrost,” said Zazula.

Source: ‘She’s perfect and she’s beautiful’: Frozen baby woolly mammoth discovered in Yukon gold fields | CBC News