Category: Fun (page 1 of 2)

Fun smartphone-based party games

At our co-op meetup last week, once we’d got business out of the way for the day, we decided to play some games. Bryan‘s got a projector in his living room which he can hook up to his laptop, and he invited us all to create a Kahoot! quiz. We then played each others’ quizzes, which was fun.

Back at home, I’d already introduced my two children to AirConsole, which they use to play games using their tablets as controllers. I searched for games we could play on the big screen without having to download anything and the first one we played was called Multeor. This involves each player controlling a ‘meteor’ which destroys things to collect points.

Multeor

A list I found on Reddit was also useful, although some of them are games that have to be purchased via the Steam marketplace. We played Spaceteam which, appropriately enough for our meetup describes itself  as “a cooperative shouting game for phones and tablets”. It didn’t require the project, and was great fun. I even played it with my wife when I got home!

While I’m on the subject of games, Laura introduced me to Paddle Force, which our former Mozilla colleagues Bobby Richter and Luke Pacholski created. It’s like Pong on steroids, and my children love it! Luke’s also created Pixel Drift, which reminds me a lot of playing Super Off Road at the arcades as a kid!

Federico Leggio’s type animations

These type animations by Federico Leggio, a freelance graphic designer based in Sicily, are incredible:

To inifinity and

Twist

New horizons

Source: Federico Leggio (via Dense Discovery)

Drink Talk Learn

I’ve been to many a TeachMeet, some where alcohol has been involved. But this sounds even more fun:

Drink Talk Learn rules

Source: BuzzFeed (via Ian Usher)

 

Gamifying Wikipedia for new editors

Hands up who uses Wikipedia? OK, keep your hands up if you edit it too? Ah.

Not only does Wikipedia need our financial donations to keep running, it also needs our time. To encourage people to edit it, the Wikimedia Foundation have created an ‘adventure’ by way of orientation.

It’s split into seven stages:

  1. Say Hello to the World
  2. An Invitation to Earth
  3. Small Changes, Big Impact
  4. The Neutral Point of View
  5. The Veil of Verifiability
  6. The Civility Code
  7. Looking Good Together

It’s always good to be a little playful, especially when welcoming people into a project or community. There’s also an ‘Interstellar Lounge‘ where you can chill out, listen to openly-licensed music, and get help!

Source: Wikipedia (via Scott Leslie)

What would you do if you were the richest man in the world? Now you can find out!

This is simultaneously amusing and horrifying:

A simple text-based adventure exploring the age-old question: What would you do if you had more money than any single human being should ever have?

It’s a text-based adventure game that gives you options as the richest man on earth, while educating you on how that money was amassed, and the scale of what would be possible with that kind of wealth.

Source: You Are Jeff Bezos

Bullshit receptivity scale

I love academia. Apparently researchers in psychology are using ‘hyperactive agency detection’ and a ‘Bullshit Receptivity Scale’ in their work to describe traits found in human subjects. It’s particularly useful when researching the tendency of people to believe in conspiracy theories, apparently:

Participants’ receptivity to superficially profound statements was measured using the Bullshit Receptivity Scale (Pennycook et al., 2015). This measure consists of nine seemingly impressive statements that follow rules of syntax and contain fancy words, but do not have any intentional meaning (e.g., “Wholeness quiets infinite phenomena”; “Imagination is inside exponential space time events”). Participants rated each of the items’ profoundness on a scale from 1 (Not at all profound) to 5 (Very profound). They were given the following definition of profound for reference: “of deep meaning; of great and broadly inclusive significance.”

[…]

To measure participants’ tendency to attribute intent to events, we asked them to interpret the actions portrayed by animated shapes (Abell, Happé, & Frith, 2000), a series of videos lasting from thirty seconds to one minute depicting two triangles
whose actions range from random (e.g., bumping around the screen following a geometric pattern) to resembling complex social interactions (e.g., one shape “bullying” the other). These animations were originally designed to detect deficits in the development of theory of mind.

I’ve no idea about the validity of the conclusions in this particular study (especially as it doesn’t seem to be peer-reviewed yet) but I always like discovering terms that provide a convenient shorthand.

For example, I can imagine exclaiming that someone is “off the Bullshit Receptivity Scale!” or has “hyperactive agency detection”. Nice.

Source: SSRN (via Pharyngula)

Everything is potentially a meme

Despite — or perhaps because of — my feelings towards the British monarchy, this absolutely made my day:

Town crier meme - library

Town crier meme - Virgin media

Isn’t the internet great?

Source: Haha

Random Street View does exactly what you think it does

Today’s a non-work day for me but, after reviewing resource-centric social media sites as part of my Moodle work yesterday, I rediscovered the joy of StumbleUpon.

That took me to lots of interesting sites which, if you haven’t used the service before, become more relevant to your tastes as time goes on if you use the thumbs up / thumbs down tool.

I came across this Random Street View site which I’ve a sneaking suspicion I’ve seen before. Not only is it a fascinating way to ‘visit’ lesser-known parts of the world, it also shows the scale of Google’s Street View programme.

The teacher in me imagines using this as the starting point for some kind of project. It could be a writing prompt, you could use it to randomly find somewhere to do some research on, or it could even be an art project.

Great stuff.

Source: Random Street View

xkcd on conversational dynamics

xkcd cartoon

Source: xkcd

Browser extensions FTW

Last week, the New York Times issued a correction to an article written by Justin Bank about President Trump. This was no ordinary correction, however:

Because of an editing error involving a satirical text-swapping web browser extension, an earlier version of this article misquoted a passage from an article by the Times reporter Jim Tankersley. The sentence referred to America’s narrowing trade deficit during “the Great Recession,” not during “the Time of Shedding and Cold Rocks.” (Pro tip: Disable your “Millennials to Snake People” extension when copying and pasting.)

Social networks went crazy over it. 😂

The person responsible has written an excellent follow-up article about the joys of browser extensions:

Browser extensions, when used properly and sensibly, can make your internet experience more productive and efficient. They can make thesaurus recommendations, more accessible, create to-do lists in new tabs, or change the color scheme of web pages to make them more readable.

The examples given by the author are all for the Chrome web browser, but all modern browsers have extensions:

Unfortunately — if somewhat comically — my use of that extension last week was far from joyful or efficient. But, despite my embarrassment to have distracted from the good work of my colleagues, I still passionately recommend the subversive, web-altering extensions you can find in a category the Chrome Web Store lists as “fun“.

Here’s my three favourite of the ones he lists in the article (which, as ever, I suggest you check out in full):

I’m particularly pleased to have come across the Word Replacer (Chrome) extension which allows you to effectively make your own extension. But as the author notes, be careful of the consequences when copy/pasting…

Source: The New York Times