The best way out is always through

So said Robert Frost, but I want to begin with the ending of a magnificent post from Kate Bowles. She expresses clearly how I feel sometimes when I sit down to write something for Thought Shrapnel:

[T]his morning I blocked out time, cleared space, and sat down to write — and nothing happened. Nothing. Not a word, not even a wisp of an idea. After enough time staring at the blankness of the screen I couldn’t clearly remember having had an idea, ever.

Along the way I looked at the sky, I ate a mandarin and then a second mandarin, I made a cup of tea, I watched a family of wrens outside my window, I panicked. I let email divert me, and then remembered that was the opposite of the plan. I stayed off Twitter. Panic increased.

Then I did the one thing that absolutely makes a difference to me. I asked for help. I said “I write so many stupid words in my bullshit writing job that I can no longer write and that is the end of that.” And the person I reached out to said very calmly “Why not write about the thing you’re thinking about?”

Sometimes what you have to do as a writer is sit in place long enough, and sometimes you have to ask for help. Whatever works for you, is what works.

Kate Bowles

There are so many things wrong with the world right now, that sometimes I feel like I could stop working on all of the things I’m working on and spend time just pointing them out to people.

But to what end? You don’t change the world by just making people aware of things, not usually. For example, as tragic as the sentence, “the Amazon is on fire” is, it isn’t in and of itself a call-to-action. These days, people argue about the facts themselves as well as the appropriate response.

The world is an inordinately complicated place that we seek to make sense of by not thinking as much as humanly possible. To aid and abet us in this task, we divide ourselves, either consciously or unconsciously, into groups who apply similar heuristics. The new (information) is then assimilated into the old (worldview).

I have no privileged position, no objective viewpoint in which to observe and judge the world’s actions. None of us do. I’m as complicit in joining and forming in and out groups as the next person. I decide I’m going to delete my Twitter account and then end up rage-tweeting All The Things.

Thankfully, there are smart people, and not only academics, thinking about all this to figure out what we can and should do. Tim Urban, from the phenomenally-successful Wait But Why, for example, has spent the last three years working on “a new language we can use to think and talk about our societies and the people inside of them”. In the first chapter in a new series, he writes about the ongoing struggle between (what he calls) the ‘Primitive Minds’ and ‘Higher Minds’ of humans:

The never-ending struggle between these two minds is the human condition. It’s the backdrop of everything that has ever happened in the human world, and everything that happens today. It’s the story of our times because it’s the story of all human times.

Tim Urban

I think this is worth remembering when we spend time on social networks. And especially when we spend so much time that it becomes our default delivery method for the news of the day. Our Primitive Minds respond strongly to stimuli around fear and fornication.

When we reflect on our social media usage and the changing information landscape, the temptation is either to cut down, or to try a different information diet. Some people become the equivalent of Information Vegans, attempting to source the ‘cleanest’ morsels of information from the most wholesome, trusted, and traceable of places.

But where are those ‘trusted places’ these days? Are we as happy with the previously gold-standard news outlets such as the BBC and The New York Times as we once were? And if not, what’s changed?

The difference, I think, is the way we’ve decided to allow money to flow through our digital lives. Commercial news outlets, including those with which the BBC competes, are funded by advertising. Those adverts we see in digital spaces aren’t just showing things that we might happen to be interested in. They’ll keep on showing you that pair of shoes you almost bought last week in every space that is funded by advertising. Which is basically everywhere.

I feel like I’m saying obvious things here that everyone knows, but perhaps it bears repeating. If everyone is consuming news via social networks, and those news stories are funded by advertising, then the nature of what counts as ‘news’ starts to evolve. What gets the most engagement? How are headlines formed now, compared with a decade ago?

It’s as if something hot-wires our brain when something non-threatening and potentially interesting is made available to us ‘for free’. We never get to the stuff that we’d like to think defines us, because we caught in neverending cycles of titillation. We pay with our attention, that scarce and valuable resource.

Our attention, and more specifically, how we react to our social media feeds when we’re ‘engaged’ is valuable because it can be packaged up and sold to advertisers. But it’s also sold to governments too. Twitter just had to update their terms and conditions specifically because of the outcry over the Chinese government’s propaganda around the Hong Kong protests.

Protesters part of the ‘umbrella revolution’ in Hong Kong have recently been focusing on cutting down what we used to call CCTV cameras, but which are much more accurately described as ‘facial recognition masts’:

We are living in a world where the answer to everything seems to be ‘increased surveillance’. Kids not learning fast enough in school? Track them more. Scared of terrorism? Add more surveillance into the lives of everyday citizens. And on and on.

In an essay earlier this year, Maciej Cegłowski riffed on all of this, reflecting on what he calls ‘ambient privacy’:

Because our laws frame privacy as an individual right, we don’t have a mechanism for deciding whether we want to live in a surveillance society. Congress has remained silent on the matter, with both parties content to watch Silicon Valley make up its own rules. The large tech companies point to our willing use of their services as proof that people don’t really care about their privacy. But this is like arguing that inmates are happy to be in jail because they use the prison library. Confronted with the reality of a monitored world, people make the rational decision to make the best of it.

That is not consent.

Ambient privacy is particularly hard to protect where it extends into social and public spaces outside the reach of privacy law. If I’m subjected to facial recognition at the airport, or tagged on social media at a little league game, or my public library installs an always-on Alexa microphone, no one is violating my legal rights. But a portion of my life has been brought under the magnifying glass of software. Even if the data harvested from me is anonymized in strict conformity with the most fashionable data protection laws, I’ve lost something by the fact of being monitored.

Maciej Cegłowski

One of the difficulties in resisting the ‘Silicon Valley narrative’ and Big Tech’s complicity with governments is the danger of coming across as a neo-luddite. Without looking very closely to understand what’s going on (and having some time to reflect) it can all look like the inevitable march of progress.

So, without necessarily an answer to all this, I guess the best thing is, like Kate, to ask for help. What can we do here? What practical steps can we take? Comments are open.

7 Comments

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  1. Doug
    Well constructed post. Enjoyed the links.

    Help? Dunnno about that but here’s my two-penneth in response.

    I like to remember that ‘Efimerída’ is the Greek word for ‘newspaper’, same root as ephemeral. I treat a lot of news thusly and try not to sweat the small stuff. Otherwise my response to issues that bug me:

    Act locally. Engage F2F with the people around you by contributing to the work of community groups. I’ve met some amazing people and experienced some tangible, rewarding results that have made a real difference to my local environment.

    Choose your online affilations and activist networks carefully. It’s easy, say, to want to support the cause of human rights in the Palestinian territories and end up in bed with an anti-semite. Bad too is supporting groups that turn out to be self serving and ineffective (no names). My own default contribution is to PEN International who have a solid core manifesto and track record based on three of my core values; writing, human rights, and education.

    Write to MP’s or relevant legislators about the issues that concern you (Maybe give your MEP a miss). It can be equally rewarding or frustrating but it’s important to let them know that you care and it acts as a steam vent. Sometimes too they are actually unaware of situations, or their potential, and appreciate the mail.

  2. Start small, and make change within smaller circles. To grapple with the larger world is so difficult that it can feel as it all roads are dead ends. Your post reminds me to remind myself, so you are starting small and making progress already. And to begin with Kate makes my next step to head over there, and maybe draw a line from here to there, and maybe somewhere else. Small steps. To do anything other than that seems foolish most days (but not all days).
    Kevin

  3. Another great post, typically I posted a blog post I was proud of came here and slapped myself for not including cool photo and wicked quotes. I spoke to Marie-Claire in women in games this week about the need to properly fund game makers to make diverse games that encourage positive social change. I said Ihave lots of notes and thoughts , she said “Your are always taking great notes and thinking, BUT this year we need action” – I agree I started with a small blog post myself https://discursive.adamprocter.co.uk/2019/09/12/games-as-agents.html

    I think it connects to your thoughts

    • Thanks Adam, you say in your post:

      “Yet every one of the makers that have realised that they can have this type of impact, raised concerns on funding, not just for the project itself but just to pay the bills. They often resign themselves to the fact that this is the life of an “Artist”. This is often coupled with a realisation that the large games companies fail to take risks and just back the same titles again and again.”

      Unfortunately, to me the answer to all this is that people respond to incentives. Huge game studios are incentivised to create stuff that makes money. What sells? Stuff they’ve done before with big guns and sports.

      So yes. Capitalism sucks 🙁

  4. Great thought-provoking article as usual Doug.
    I attempted to address an element of this post in the Medium article below, a snippet;

    “The message here is not to be afraid to live in a digitally connected world, it is to be cognizant of the ramifications of it. Ensure personal information is only provided when absolutely required. When an organization requests your — name, address, phone, email, birthdate, etc., remember they should be earning your loyalty — or asking for your honest opinion — not bribing you to participate.”

    Although my article was written (with a quote from you) to support core tenets of our SaaS application, it’s universally applicable.

    https://medium.com/@bflanders/thank-you-for-your-loyalty-identity-ca1db3afb8c

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